Huppert visits nursery school after praising it in Parliament


MP Julian Huppert visited the Fields Children’s Centre on Cambridge’s Galfrid Road to discuss how we can ensure that more children get a high-quality nursery experience.

MP Julian Huppert visited the Fields Children’s Centre on Cambridge’s Galfrid Road to discuss how we can ensure that more children get a high-quality nursery experience.

And earlier in the week he spoke in a debate in Parliament about Nursery Schools, where he highlighted the success of the six local authority Nursery Schools in Cambridgeshire, who have recently been recognised jointly as a Teaching School, recognising their high quality and ability to train nursery teachers for the future.

He secured praise from Pat Glass MP, who is on the Education Select Committee and led the debate, who described them as ‘a model for nursery schools in the future’.

Julian said ‘High quality nursery school teaching, with qualified nursery teachers, can make a huge difference to how children develop and learn. I was really impressed by how the children at the Fields were enjoying themselves as the played and learned. There is lots of evidence that play-based learning is a great way for children to learn and enjoy learning, and I was pleased to see how well it was being done at the Fields, as it is across the other nursery schools.

“Early years matter, and that is why in government we have delivered 15 hours of extra early years’ provision for three and four-year-olds, giving Cambridgeshire £4 million. And 3,400 disadvantaged two-year-olds are receiving free nursery places as well

“We would increase that free child care to 20 hours in the next Parliament for working families. It is so important that we provide the funding these nurseries need so that we give our children the best chance.”

Amanda Bannister. Headteacher of Cambridge’s Brunswick Nursery School said: “The maintained nursery schools in Cambridgeshire provide high quality education for children in the county. We are recognized nationally as a collective with exceptional skills, provision and practice and have a proven track record of developing and delivering training for early years’ practitioners. It is vital that nursery schools continue to be at the heart of early years’ education.”

Despite their success and others like them across the country, the number of local authority funded nursery schools have fallen from 599 in 1980 to just 418 now, with more than 100 nursery schools in Britain closing since 1999. In a recent survey conducted by Early Education, 77 per cent of nursery schools reported that they were concerned about their future viability or faced imminent loss of their independence.


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